Zinc and Acne: Does Zinc Help With Acne?

Zinc and acne

Zinc won’t cure acne – but it can help acne if you’re deficient.

Let’s get right down to it.

While zinc isn’t a magical cure-all for acne, it turns out that many acne sufferers are deficient in zinc.

And their acne often improves when they start supplementing it!

Zinc is a trace mineral essential to all forms of life because of its fundamental role in gene expression, cell growth and cell replication. And it’s especially important for clear skin.[1]

In fact, taking zinc or eating zinc-rich foods is a simple way to cover your bases for clear skin… and there’s a good chance that you’re deficient!

Turns out zinc deficiency is much more common than previously thought.

Watch Sonia explain it all:

Are you deficient in zinc?

Here are some symptoms of zinc deficiency:

  • White spots on your fingernails
  • Dry skin
  • Hangnails
  • Frequent colds
  • Hair loss
  • Diarrhea
  • Low sex drive
  • Acne

As I just mentioned, there’s a good chance you’re not getting enough zinc in your diet. (In fact, according to the World Health Organization, a whole 31.7% of the world’s population is zinc deficient.[2] That’s over two billion people!)

Do you eat a lot of whole grains and beans? If so, you’re doubly at risk for zinc deficiency, because these foods contain phytates, which bind up minerals (including zinc) and prevent you from absorbing them. So even though whole grains contain more minerals than refined grains, you can’t really absorb them at all unless you ferment / soak your grains first (which neutralizes the phytates, to some extent).

Furthermore, vegetarians and vegans are at an even greater risk for zinc deficiency, because the zinc from plant foods is four times more difficult to absorb than zinc from meat.[3]

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How do I know if I’m zinc deficient?

Well, unfortunately, zinc blood tests are notoriously unreliable because zinc isn’t found as much in blood – it’s mostly inside the cells.

What can you do about this?

First take a look at your diet.

Are you vegetarian, vegan, or an infrequent meat-eater? Do you eat whole grains and/or beans with most meals?

If you answered “yes” to either of these questions, then there’s a good chance you’re deficient. And of course, if you experience some of the symptoms of zinc deficiency, that’s a good sign as well.

If you begin taking zinc and your acne doesn’t improve within a few weeks (see below for the recommended daily dosage), does that mean you weren’t deficient? Not necessarily.

For some very lucky people, a zinc deficiency is the “straw that breaks the camel’s back” when it comes to their acne, and so taking zinc improves their skin right away!

For the vast majority of zinc-deficient people, however, this is just one piece in the greater acne puzzle, which includes a variety of other diet and lifestyle factors.

So if you fall into this majority, and zinc doesn’t clear up your acne, take heart, and don’t give up! Explore our other recommendations for improving your diet and lifestyle around the blog and in our book.

So… what’s zinc good for anyway?

Zinc is crucial for proper immune system function, triggering the birth of white blood cells. Zinc plays a role in over 300 enzymes in the body, and helps form cellular DNA. It also plays a key role in the proper functioning of insulin, and you’ve got to have a healthy, functioning insulin system if you want clear skin.

Why is zinc important for clear skin?

While the exact mechanisms are unknown, zinc most likely promotes healthy skin by carrying vitamin A to your skin and by regulating your body’s hormonal balance.[4]

Also, a recent study found that zinc facilitates apoptosis, or programmed cell death, which is a natural part of your skin renewing itself. If apoptosis is delayed, as in the case of zinc deficiency, skin cells stick together instead of dying and sloughing off like they should, which leads to clogged pores. (Interesting fact: isotretinoin, the active ingredient in Accutane, also uses this mechanism of cell apoptosis to treat acne.[5] )

So, along with other important dietary changes (such as eliminating dairy), also make sure you’re getting enough zinc.

What’s the best type of zinc supplement for acne?

There’s a clear winner: zinc picolinate.

Studies suggest that zinc picolinate is the most easily absorbed form – much more so than zinc gluconate or zinc citrate. Anecdotal reports from acne sufferers also confirm this. This is because your body forms zinc picolinate naturally from the zinc in real food – your body combines zinc in the intestines with picolinic acid, which is secreted by the pancreas.

If you can’t find zinc picolinate in your local health food or supplement store, just grab it off Amazon*.

Update: zinc monomethionine* is another great option, comparable to zinc picolinate in absorbability.

*Note: These are affiliate links, which means we receive compensation if you make purchases using these links. Visit our disclaimer page for more information.

How much zinc for acne?

You want to get between 15 and 30 milligrams of zinc per day in total, so the amount you supplement might depend somewhat on your diet.

For most people who need it, supplementing with 10-15mg of zinc per day is ideal.

If you eat plenty of meat, and you don’t eat grains or beans much, then you probably are best not supplementing at all.

Again, with zinc, more is not better – do not exceed these recommendations, because you’ll risk copper deficiency, which can have serious health implications.[6]

WARNING: do not take zinc on an empty stomach! It could make you throw up. I become very nauseated when I take zinc without eating anything. So take zinc halfway through a meal or right after eating to prevent nausea. Zinc picolinate, in comparison to other forms, is also the easiest on the stomach – another reason to go with this form of zinc as a step toward getting clear skin.

And just in case you’re not too hot on taking supplements, here are some whole foods you can use to boost your zinc intake:

  • Oysters
  • Crab
  • Grass-fed beef and lamb
  • Pumpkin seeds

Like most vitamins and minerals, zinc from real food is generally easier to absorb than from supplements.

Avoid copper deficiency

As zinc and copper work together in the body, it is important to make sure that if you’re supplementing zinc, you’re getting some copper in your diet, too – but not too much.

Copper and zinc are balanced in meat and seafood, so those are great foods to eat frequently. Dark chocolate and most nuts and seeds are rich in copper but have relatively less zinc, so eating some of these is fine, but avoid going overboard.

If you’re not eating these copper-containing foods and want to supplement with zinc, choose a zinc supplement that contains copper, like this one (affiliate link – see disclaimer).

Key Takeaways

Except for a lucky few people, no supplement or combination of supplements by themselves are going to cure acne. It’s by choosing to eat nutrient-dense whole foods like these – and knowing which acne-causing foods to avoid – that people are healing their acne every day.

  • Increasing zinc intake can improve your acne if you’re deficient.
  • You might be deficient if you don’t eat much red meat or seafood, and/or you eat lots of whole grains or beans.
  • The best source of zinc is whole foods, but supplements are a good compromise if you can’t or won’t eat zinc-rich foods.
  • DO NOT take zinc supplements on an empty stomach! Take with a meal to avoid nausea.
  • Zinc can be a helpful addition to a holistic diet- and lifestyle-based treatment for acne, but it doesn’t fix the root causes of acne by itself.
  • You need to fix your diet and lifestyle to really cure the root causes of acne (that’s what our book is all about!).

Also, if you haven’t read it yet, be sure to check out the article on Vitamin D for Acne. Vitamin D is another one of our Top 3 Clear Skin Tips, i.e. one of the most little-known, important, and easy things you can do right now to start clearing up your skin.

About Devin Mooers

Devin MooersHey! Over the past 10 years, I've developed a powerful system for clearing acne with a little-known diet- and lifestyle-based method, and I want to spread the love. That's why I started Clear Skin Forever back in 2011. I studied engineering and product design at Stanford University, and graduated in the top 5% of my class, but afterward, I decided to focus on writing about health, since I found it so fulfilling to help people clear their acne for good. Thanks for reading, and sign up for email updates to stay in the loop with clear skin tips! Also, be sure to check out our book if you haven't yet, all about how to fix acne permanently with diet and lifestyle changes. We've helped thousands of people get clear skin this way!

Sources (click to expand)

  1. Hambidge M. Human zinc deficiency. J Nutr. 2000 May;130(5S Suppl): 1344S-9S. Review. ^
  2. Caulfield L, Black, RE. Zinc deficiency. In: Ezzati M, Lopez AD, Rodgers A, Murray CJL, eds. Comparative quantification of health risks: global and regional burden of disease attributable to selected major risk factors. Vol 1. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 2004:257–79. http://www.who.int/publications/cra/chapters/volume1/0257-0280.pdf ^
  3. http://www.aminoz.com.au/importance-zinc-zinc-deficiency-a-375.html ^
  4. Truong-Tran AQ, Ho LH, Chai F, Zalewski PD. Cellular zinc fluxes and the regulation of apoptosis/gene-directed cell death. J Nutr. 2000 May;130(5S Suppl):1459S-66S. Review. ^
  5. Nelson AM, Zhao W, Gilliland KL, Zaenglein AL, Liu W, Thiboutot DM. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin mediates 13-cis retinoic acid-induced apoptosis of human sebaceous gland cells. J Clin Invest. 2008 Apr;118(4): 1468-78. ^
  6. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/zinc/ ^
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{ 48 Comments }

  1. Sam says

    Hi Devin,

    How low PUFA diets do you recommend? Do you think you can get all the PUFAs you need from eating beans, whole grains and whole milk? I have always felt terrible every time I have eaten seeds, fish oil and other EFA supplements.

    • Devin Mooers says

      Hey Sam! Yeah, definitely. Very low PUFA is good. It’s all about quality and freshness with PUFA – most fish oils, seeds, supplements, etc. are totally rancid by the time you ingest them. Yes, the Inuit traditionally eat tons of seal blubber (high in PUFA), but it’s extremely fresh and non-oxidized when ingested, and they also eat thyroid glands of seals, which provides loads of iodine and thyroid hormone to block lipid peroxidation of that PUFA.

      How do you feel with raw oysters, have you tried that? They’re a prime acne-busting food, with lots of zinc and also super-fresh DHA.

  2. Brooke Turley says

    Ok, you’re officially talking crappy science, in light of this article about marigolds and chickens. Apparently it very much does indeed improve eggs to have marigolds in the chickens’ diets.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/scialert.net/fulltext/amp.php%3fdoi=ijps.2017.11.15

    I certainly hope that no one has gone and altered either their own diet or that of their poultry, just because of your half-baked scare tactics. Good grief. “ Fake orange” in nature, indeed.

    • Devin Mooers says

      Hey Brooke! Wow, color me (majorly) wrong. Thanks for pointing this out! That was really sloppy – I don’t know what I thought that marigold color would not be related to an antioxidant carotene. Sloppy, sloppy, sloppy. I’m sorry about this carelessness – I have removed this from the post after following up on the articles you linked! I will try to be more careful next time.

  3. Brooke Turley says

    Hi, I hate to burst your anti-marigold bubble, but the thing is, marigolds are orange themselves due to caratenoids! They’re full of nutrients, actually, and there’s no such thing as “fake orange” in nature.

    (Unless I count the time that my dad consumed massive quantities of beta-carotene in his heroic search for a natural “fake tan”. That time, “fake orange” definitely fit the bill.)

    Here’s an article that details the nutritional profile of marigolds:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1756464612000734

    • Devin Mooers says

      Hey Brooke! (Just duplicating the response here to your other comment) Wow, color me (majorly) wrong. Thanks for pointing this out! That was really sloppy – I don’t know what I thought that marigold color would not be related to an antioxidant carotene. Sloppy, sloppy, sloppy. I’m sorry about this carelessness – I have removed this from the post after following up on the articles you linked! I will try to be more careful next time.

  4. tom hennessy says

    Researchers in a recent study took 60 women with hyperandrogenemia which has cystic acne as a major symptom, and reduced the iron in 30 by phlebotomy, and gave the ‘standard of care’ to the other 30, found, phlebotomy to reduce iron levels was as effective as the drugs used in the ‘standard of care’.

    Effect of phlebotomy versus oral contraceptives containing cyproterone acetate on the clinical and biochemical parameters in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. J Ovarian Res 12, 78 (2019).

    https://doi.org/10.1186/s13048-019-0554-9

    There seems to be more to the iron than we fully realize ..

    • Devin Mooers says

      Hey Tom – whoa, that’s fascinating! Great find! Amazing that phlebotomy brought on normal menstruation in 44% of subjects – I bet if they also added 3,000 IU of retinol, it would have improved results even more (vit. A boosts ceruloplasmin production to bind excess free iron).

  5. Luo says

    Stress can induce a series of negative effects on the human body. Many people are easily depressed under pressure, which has a bad influence on the treatment of acne.
    Some people overeating under pressure, too much sugar can easily induce acne.
    And stress can make people unable to sleep, and lack of sleep has too much effect on the skin.

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Master your acne in 4 weeks or less
  • Fix the root causes of your acne: fluoride, diet, sleep, stress & more
  • Exclusive forum access with 4,000+ members
  • Food Explorer App with skin safety ratings of 450+ foods
  • 96% of customers satisfied